Apple Park in Cupertino, CA (IMAGE: Google Maps)

On June 2, Apple announced that from September, its employees should return to working from its offices, the impressive Apple Park in Cupertino, California, and will only be able to work from home two days a week for a maximum of two weeks a year, with management approval. …


IMAGE: wal_172619 — Pixabay (CC0)

Finally, after many rounds of talks over many months, the London G7 summit, attended by Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States and the European Union as a guest, reached a historic agreement to create a common corporate tax rate of 15% for companies with international activities, which will always be paid in the countries where the activity is generated, thus closing off the possibilities of tax engineering that allowed many companies to to pay virtually zero tax, despite huge profits.

The largest and most profitable multinational enterprises will now be taxed on at least 20%…


IMAGE: Silviu Ojog (CC BY)

As more and more countries extend their vaccination campaigns, with the US authorities saying that 99.992% of fully inoculated people can resist Covid, the de-escalation process, the supposed return to normality after an 18-month hiatus, is underway.

But what does normality mean? Within a few weeks of the first lockdowns in March 2020, forced to work from home, we quickly learned new habits: few of us had ever tried videoconferencing, and if we had, the call was usually set up for us by the IT department. Now everybody is doing it.

Then there’s the half hour or more we used…


An interesting article by Justin Rowlatt on the BBC website, “Why electric cars will take over sooner than you think”, applies the S-curve of the technology life cycle to electric car sales, comparing what is happening at the moment to the spread of internet connectivity in the late ’90s and early ’00s, and concludes that we are at the point of the exponential growth phase.

This growth is derived mainly from the improvement in price and autonomy caused by the availability of better batteries, and increasingly, by the announcements of more and more brands that will stop making internal combustion…


IMAGE: Ryan McGuire — Pixabay (CC0)

As the pandemic is gradually brought under control in a growing number of countries and we return to using public transportation, many of us want to take the opportunity to make this option attractive to everybody, including those who can afford to drive and park in cities, and through ambitious investment plans find a solution to congestion and air pollution.

Green public transportation policies could play a major role in defining our post-pandemic future: we desperately need to abandon fossil fuels, but even if we start transitioning toward electric vehicles for private use (responsible for 75% of urban emissions), emissions…


IMAGE: Amazon Sidewalk

Amazon has announced that as of June 8, all the company’s devices (Echo home assistants, Ring cameras, etc.) in the United States will automatically connect with each other, forming a vast wireless mesh network via Bluetooth and radio signals in the 900MHz band, to create Amazon Sidewalk, its IoT service provider. …


Palantir is one of the most sinister companies in the world. Founded in May 2003 by ultra-conservative Peter Thiel after his departure from PayPal, the company has been under his leadership for 17 years, during which it has amassed the largest collection of personal data worldwide on behalf of governments, immigration agencies and police departments around the world, even collaborating with the United Nations on projects that usually impacted negatively on those subjected to its spying.

The company, which embodies all that is wrong and unethical about data science, has never turned a profit, despite signing multi-million dollar contracts with…


As the vaccination campaigns around the world gain traction and companies start thinking about a post-pandemic future, the possibility of returning to the office looms.

The pandemic and the changes it imposed on how we work now provide a unique opportunity to take a more flexible approach to work; but not all companies and managers are capable of taking advantage of it. For many of them, the fact that 65% of people who have experienced distributed work during the pandemic want to continue working that way, and that 33% like the idea of hybrid models that combine distributed work with…


IMAGE: Twitter

Twitter is launching its Twitter Blue subscription service, for the moment in just two markets, Canada and Australia, priced at $3.49 Canadian and $4.49 Australian dollars, with the idea that in the United States it will cost $2.99.

This premium version of Twitter offers some additional features, such as an Undo button for tweets that will offer up to 30 seconds to undo an update and correct it if desired, a folder for storing tweets into subfolders, a reading mode that makes it easier to view threads, some color customization options, and an exclusive technical service. …


IMAGE: Gina Dittmer (CC0)

This week has produced a spectacular batch of news stories highlighting the many contradictions facing us as we embark on the greatest technological transition in our history: abandoning fossil fuels.

Shell, one of the world’s largest oil companies, has been forced by a Dutch court to cut its emissions much faster than originally planned: 45% by 2030, with the court arguing that the company’s decarbonization targets were incompatible with the Paris Agreement.

The news, which could (and should) trigger a wave of similar cases around the world, coincides with increased pressure on the boards of two other of the world’s…

Enrique Dans

Professor of Innovation at IE Business School, blogger at enriquedans.com and Senior Contributor at Forbes

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